Shoes on floor of paint

Rate this article and enter to win

Do you see yourself as creative? Maybe you don’t play a musical instrument and didn’t wow in grade school art class. Perhaps you see your creativity in your Instagram posts but not in your economics paper or the way you fixed your wonky bike. Maybe you’re a pragmatist: Creativity has value, but life’s too short. If so, you may be sidelining a fundamental aspect of yourself. We are all wired to create, and we can approach any situation in life with a creative spirit. We all have the capacity to dream, explore, discover, build, ask questions, and seek answers.

H2: What can creativity do for me?

Recognizing ourselves as creators and fostering creativity in our everyday existence brings us to life and connects us to who we are. Anyone can make a conscious decision to live this way. Creativity is associated with many positive traits and behaviors.

Creativity expands our minds and self-confidence

When we engage in creative activities, we tend to become absorbed in what we’re making, entering a kind of flow state that can induce a sense of control, enjoyment, and accomplishment.

Creative work can also act as a positive distraction, directing our attention to an enjoyable activity and potentially broadening it in a way that facilitates new ways of thinking.

Creative expression opens us up to who we are; our unique set of qualities, experiences, and contradictions.

People who engage in a creative lifestyle tend to be more open-minded, imaginative, intellectually curious, energetic, outgoing, persistent, and internally motivated by their activity. They report a greater sense of well-being. One study found that inspiration leads to increased optimism, belief in one’s capabilities, self-determination, and self-esteem.

Creativity helps us cope and heal

Creativity truly carries healing power. Creative work can help us make meaning out of challenges and suffering that may feel senseless. This seems to contribute to psychological growth after trauma, according to research. Creative work is also a sign that growth or healing has occurred.

Paul Klee, the Swiss painter, suffered from a rare autoimmune disease that crippled his hands. In the year after his diagnosis, Klee created more than 1,200 works, including some of his largest, most original pieces. “I create—in order not to cry,” he said.

Highly creative people do certain things differently. Here are ten things you can learn from them.

10 ways to nourish your creativity

Illustration of creative icons including rocket and brain emerging from box1. Allow yourself imaginative play

Go ahead—dance, paint, explore a new place, be silly, and have fun. You might just find that it gets your creative juices flowing.

2. Be passionate about your creative process

Craft goals that emphasize learning (like experimenting with sound) rather than mastery (like winning a Grammy). Visualize the desired goal, then possible obstacles. This helps identify useful strategies—like grit, optimism, passion, and hope.

3. Make time for solitude

Set aside a special time and place in your life for creative thinking and work, such as rising early to write, or meditating before a painting session.

4. Honor the emotional messiness that leads to intuition

Insights (those “Aha!” moments) are like gifts from the unconscious mind. Emerging research suggests that bringing together positive and negative emotions (emotional ambivalence) can help facilitate insights. Think of the bittersweet excitement of graduation.

5. Be open to experience

The more an experience leads you to conceive of new possibilities for your life, the more you may grow. Try a new creative outlet or a totally different medium of expression. If you’re a writer, learn to play a musical instrument; if you’re a dancer, paint. Take a new route home, or seek out people with different values.

Female exploring wilderness

6. Cultivate mindfulness

Learn to observe and pay attention to your surroundings—e.g., while you’re walking across campus or cooking dinner—to cultivate everyday mindfulness. Sitting silently and focusing on the breath for five minutes a day is another great way to start meditating.

7. Let yourself daydream

When working on a creative project or assignment, try taking a five-minute daydreaming break every hour or so. Engage in a simple activity like walking, doodling, or cleaning. Consider this your creative incubation period, and see if you feel a renewed creative energy when you get back to work.

8. Cherish your sensitivity (even the painful parts)

Rather than avoiding or denying hardships and challenges, choose to live with that intense sensitivity. This makes life more difficult, but it also brings great rewards.

9. Turn adversity into advantage

Regular expressive writing (15–20 minutes) about a topic that triggers strong feelings in you is thought to help us better understand and express positive and negative emotions. This type of writing can improve psychological and physical health, and some cognitive functions, such as working memory.

10. Think differently, take risks, be prepared to fail

Cultivate a spirit of everyday nonconformity by seeking out new experiences (like studying abroad), asking impertinent questions, and engaging with numerous solutions to a problem. Turn your fear of rejection into a more constructive emotion, like anger or pride, which can fuel creative work.

SLU Resources
Get help or find out more

You must enter your name, email, and phone number so we can contact you if you're the winner of this month's drawing.
Your data will never be shared or sold to outside parties. View our Privacy Policy.

What was the most interesting thing you read in this article?

If you could change one thing about , what would it be?

HAVE YOU SEEN AT LEAST ONE THING IN THIS ISSUE THAT...

..you will apply to everyday life?

..caused you to get involved, ask for help,
utilize campus resources, or help a friend?

Tell us More
How can we get more people to read ?
First Name:

Last Name:

E-mail:

Phone Number:

What was the most interesting thing you read in this article?

If you could change one thing about , what would it be?

HAVE YOU SEEN AT LEAST ONE THING IN THIS ISSUE THAT...

..you will apply to everyday life?

..caused you to get involved, ask for help,
utilize campus resources, or help a friend?

Tell us more.
How can we get more people to read ?
First Name:

Last Name:

E-mail:

Phone Number:



HAVE YOU SEEN AT LEAST ONE THING IN THIS ISSUE THAT...

..you will apply to everyday life?

..caused you to get involved, ask for help,
utilize campus resources, or help a friend?

Tell us more.
How can we get more people to read ?

First Name:

Last Name:

E-mail:

Phone Number:



Article sources

 

Kaufman, S. B., & Gregoire, C. (2015). Wired to create: Unraveling the mysteries of the creative mind. New York, NY: Perigee. Adapted by Lucy Berrington in consultation with the authors.